Building the DCC Amplifier

This device takes any logic level DCC signal stream and converts it to ‘real’ DCC. The output voltage swing is whatever is fed into the power inputs. Typically, in both O and G scale implementations, I use a 11.1v (3 cell) or a 14.8v (4 cells) lipo.

This is a very minimalistic board. It has been reduced down to the absolute simplest design and construction possible. All components are ‘thru-hole’ so they are very easy to solder.

Building the DCC Amplifier

All the components for the DCC Amplifier. Power chip, connectors, PCB, heatsink and the logic inverter. Very simple.
Soldering on the inverter chip. Be sure to note the correct orientation with the notch on the chip.
Solder the main driver chip. It’s best to solder in just one leg, then adjust the chip by heating the one connection and moving it around until its positioned correctly. You want a few mm of leg poking through the hole. This is not critical however. ‘Close enough’ is sufficient.
Solder on the connectors- first the three pin logic connector, then the two blue power connectors. Note the polarity for later, the right terminal on both blue terminal blocks is ground. This will be very important when you finally hook this up.
Attach the heat sink. Alternatively, if you have a metal mass (lead weight for example) in your loco, you can mount this to it. You do need some form of heat sink however- if you pull large trains this may get quite warm. There are two channels in this chip ganged together, each can source 2.5amps for a total of 5 amps. It will (probably) take a peak of 6 for short periods too, however I have never pulled that much through it. In my empirical testing, I have pulled about ten cars with an Aristo U25B and a Sountraxx TSU-4400 decoder for about an hour and it gets warm to the touch but not hot.